Preventing an Addiction

Help and Support for Individuals

How Should I Avoid Pornography?

Preventing the use of pornography is critical to avoiding a pornography problem that may lead to an addiction. Below are some helpful suggestions how one can avoid pornography.

  1. Protect
    Safeguard the home. As a family, discuss and implement healthy media habits such as limiting television and computer time, installing Internet filters, and placing televisions and computers in high-use areas where the screens are visible to others.
  2. Exemplify
    Immediately turn away from suggestive images and teach your children to do the same.
  3. Love
    Develop a loving, open, and influential relationship with your children, teaching them proper values and healthy attitudes toward sexuality.
  4. Warn
    Warn family members about pornography's ability to enslave and spiritually destroy them.
  5. Teach
    Help family members understand the desensitization process that occurs from repeated exposure to immoral images and behaviors found in books, magazines, and popular television programs (see 2 Nephi 4:31, D&C; 1:31).

Related Video

Elder Russell M. Nelson

Elder Russell M. Nelson reminds parents of their sacred responsibility to teach their children (see also Ensign, May 2008, 7–10).

President Dieter F. Uchtdorf

President Dieter F. Uchtdorf emphasizes early recognition of danger and clear course correction as a path to stay safe from pornography (see also Ensign, May 2008, 57–60).

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Elder Dallin H. Oaks reminds us that the brain won't vomit back filth (see also Ensign, May 2005, 87–90).

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President Gordon B. Hinckley warns that pornography is only an evil caricature of the good and the beautiful (see also Ensign, November 2003, 82–85).

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Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin compares the dangers of pornography to the dangers of quicksand (see also Ensign, November 2004, 101–104).

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President Gordon B. Hinckley speaks of the gospel as a shelter from sleazy materials on the Internet (see also Ensign, November 2004, 59–62).